Sunday, September 25, 2011

Guest Post w/ Emma Michaels

The Writers Voice 
Where you get to know the people behind the pages 

This is Emma Michaels, the author of The Thirteenth Chime’ and I am taking over! Don’t worry, it is only for one post. To introduce you to the team of amazing authors who are a part of a new blog called, ‘The Writers Voice’. A blog run by 12 authors. Dedicated to letting you get to know each of us and the authors we feature! 

What is the hardest emotion for you to convey?

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“Blood-lust, possibly. I’ve never craved blood, so I’m using my unhealthy lust for chocolate as a substitute.” -Brenda Pandos






Photobucket“I think certain experiences in life help a writer to convey a wider range of emotion and be able to put themselves into a situation and feel it as if it were happening to them - question how they would feel if it were happening to them - so there’s not really an emotion that’s hard for me to convey but a characterization. I find it difficult to write characters that are easily swayed by other people and their opinions. Every world you create should be diverse and so should the characters and I have to remind myself of this: that not everyone can stand up for themselves, are open enough to voice their opinions, that some people just don’t have the confidence to do that. I don’t think I could ever write a heroine/hero that was easily malleable unless they developed into something MORE by the end of the novel because I love writing about characters that my readers can learn something from and look up to.” 
-Samantha Young                                            

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“I think fear. Most people are pretty consistent in how they feel fear. Some hearts race, some pound slower and harder, some stop altogether. For some people, palms might get sweaty while for others, knees might knock. Some become quiet with closed throats while others won’t shut up, sometimes screaming. But from situation to situation, each person is pretty consistent in how they physically react to this emotion. So your characters need to be consistent, too, but when they’re frequently in danger, you don’t want to become repetitive in how you describe what they’re feeling. It’s a fine line.”
-Kristie Cook


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“Sadness – because I tend to see the bright side of life.” 
-Jayde Scott 





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“Romance. Hands down. I blush at the drop of the hat. My friends find this amusing.”
-Danyelle Leafty




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“The emotion that tends to escape me is normalcy. David and Megan are so normal in their interaction and specific opinions but I’m not. My father raised me to be anyone I wanted to be which didn’t exactly make for an easy life but it made me who I am so I wouldn’t trade it for the world, the only issue is that I have no idea what normal is! I end up asking my fiancĂ© all types of random questions about what “normal people” do. Of course… he is going out with me… how would he know?” 
-Emma Michaels 



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“Hmm ... that's a tricky one. Probably being too serious. I love humor in all situations so I have to be careful with that.”
-Victoria Simcox




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“I find all emotion difficult to convey. Writing isn’t an exact science so each scene, each feeling, is unique. I have to delve in deep when I write emotions.” 
-Megg Jensen 




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“I’ve always struggled with adding enough romance or love in my books without making it corny. I don’t write romance novels, although I do enjoy a little romance in my books. It’s just a matter of finding the right balance.” -Kim Richardson





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“Grief. It’s not that I haven’t felt this emotion or do not have a clear understanding of how utterly painful it is – it’s just that when I write this emotion I remember feeling this way and those memories are hard to handle from time to time. I’ve written scenes full of heart break, but as a paranormal writer I’ve managed to avoid the full effect of the emotion of grief, a final goodbye.” 
-Jamie Magee 



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“In writing, I think the hardest emotion for me to convey is happiness, which is also the hardest emotion for Gemma, the main character in The Fallen Star, to convey.”
-Jessica Sorensen




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“Oo, that’s a hard question. I guess fear. And more in the sense of the fact that in some of my books, my characters are living in a constant state of fear so keeping the emotion high for so long is difficult.” 
-Keary Taylor 





Oh yeah, did I mention we have amazing guest authors? Here is a sneak peak of a few of the interviews we have planned for the future:

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“Sadness. I get so deeply entrenched in my character’s lives that I have a very hard time torturing them and making them sad, the way a good author must. It’s my authorly Achilles heel.”
-Inara Scott




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“I’ve never really thought about it, but probably frustration. I think it’s the most difficult to put into words, the most difficult to express in visceral terms.” 
-M. Leighton 





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“Happiness. I don’t know why but when my characters are happy I tend to go to the stereotypical and cheesy and I just feel like I’ve entered the shallow zone. I hate it when my writing isn’t deep, thought provoking and emotionally invoked.”
-Rhiannon Paille





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“Pain, both physically, and emotionally” 
-Morrigan Michele 






We are the team of authors for The Writers Voice but our blog is about so much more than just us, writing or even literature. It is about everything reading can bring to each individual person’s life, the work and lives that go into novels and all authors out there with their own stories and voices to share. I hope you will join us at The Writers Voice and hear more from our team and other writers from around the web! 

“The Writers Voice: Where you get to know the people behind the pages”

1 comment:

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